Japanese Carbon Steel

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Items 1 to 16 of 79 total
This "OLD SCHOOL" Gyuto knife was made by Sakai Genkichi from Sakai city in Osaka Prefecture in Japan. 240mm long blades are hand-forged in Japanese traditional method "Warikomi" (Inserted hard core steel between softer steel) using White steel 2 as a core. Japanese traditional knife handle made from Magnolia Wood with unique Japanese Akebono-Nuri Urushi finished.
157 USD
This "OLD SCHOOL" Petty knife was made by Sakai Genkichi from Sakai city in Osaka Prefecture in Japan. 160mm long blades are hand-forged in Japanese traditional method "Warikomi" (Inserted hard core steel between softer steel) using White steel 2 as a core. Japanese traditional knife handle made from Magnolia Wood with unique Japanese Akebono-Nuri Urushi finished.
79 USD
This beautiful Kengata Sujihiki knife (Japanese Slicer) is made by a young and talented craftsman (blacksmith) from the Saitama Prefecture, Norifumi Yoshizawa. 245mm hand-forged, three-layer (san mai) blade, made from Takefu Special Steel Company Shiro2 carbon steel (not the same but similar to Shirogami#2) as the central core, sandwiched between two layers of softer stainless steel.  Japanese traditional shape handle made from Rosewood.
242 USD
This beautiful Gyuto knife is made by a young and talented craftsman (blacksmith) from the Saitama Prefecture, Norifumi Yoshizawa. 210mm hand-forged, three-layer (san mai) blade made from Hitachi Metals Blue Steel 2 (Aogami#2) as the central core, sandwiched between two layers of softer stainless steel.  Japanese traditional shape handle made from Rosewood.
224 USD
This beautiful Gyuto knife is made by a young and talented craftsman (blacksmith) from the Saitama Prefecture, Norifumi Yoshizawa. 240mm hand-forged, three-layer (san mai) blade made from Hitachi Metals Blue Steel 2 (Aogami#2) as the central core, sandwiched between two layers of softer stainless steel.  Japanese traditional shape handle made from Rosewood.
244 USD
This "OLD SCHOOL" Petty knife was made by Sakai Genkichi from Sakai city in Osaka Prefecture, Japan. 150mm long blades are hand-forged in the Japanese traditional method "Warikomi" (Inserted hard steel between softer) using Hitachi White steel 3 (Shirogami #3) carbon steel as a core.
63 USD
This "OLD SCHOOL" Santoku knife was made by Sakai Genkichi from Sakai city in Osaka Prefecture in Japan. 180mm long blades are hand-forged in Japanese traditional method "Warikomi" (Inserted hard steel between softer) using high-purity Hitachi White steel 2 (Shirogami #2) carbon steel as a core. Japanese-style knife handle made from Magnolia Wood with unique Japanese Negoro-Nuri Urushi finished.
158 USD
This "OLD SCHOOL" Santoku knife was made by Sakai Genkichi from Sakai city in Osaka Prefecture in Japan. 180mm long blades are hand-forged in Japanese traditional method "Warikomi" (Inserted hard steel between softer) using high-purity Hitachi White steel 2 (Shirogami #2) carbon steel as a core. Japanese-style knife handle made from Magnolia Wood with unique Japanese Akebono-Nuri Urushi finished.
158 USD
Baba Hamono Kagekiyo Gyuto knife is a high-end handcrafted knife, made by the highest level of Japanese artisans awarded with the title - "Dentou Kogeshi" (Master of Traditional Craft) Sakai City, Japan. 240mm long and ultra-thin, perfectly tapered blades made from high-purity Hitachi Blue steel 2 (Aogami #2) carbon steel. Handle made from natural Magnolia wood covered with Japanese traditional lacquer Urushi.
454 USD 409 USD
Baba Hamono Kagekiyo Kiritsuke knife is a high-end handcrafted knife, made by the highest level of Japanese artisans awarded with the title - "Dentou Kogeshi" (Master of Traditional Craft) Sakai City, Japan. 240mm long and ultra-thin, perfectly tapered blades made from high-purity Hitachi White steel 2 (Shirogami #2) carbon steel. Handle made from natural Magnolia wood covered with Japanese traditional lacquer Urushi.
338 USD 304 USD
Gyuto knife made by Japanese Tetsuhiro Knife Company from Sanjo City in Niigata Prefecture. 240 mm long blade made by Japanese traditional method "Varicomi" (Inserted hard steel between softer stainless steel) using super-pure high carbon Blue Super steel as a core. Western-style knife handle made from strong black paper micarta.
202 USD 172 USD
Nakiri knife made by Japanese Tetsuhiro Knife Company from Sanjo City in Niigata Prefecture. 160mm long blade made by Japanese traditional method "Varicomi" (Inserted hard steel between softer stainless steel) using super-pure high carbon Blue steel 2 (Aogami 2) as a core. Western-style handle made from solid black paper micarta.
97 USD 82 USD
Baba Hamono Kagekiyo Gyuto knife is a high-end handcrafted knife, made by the highest level of Japanese artisans awarded with the title - "Dentou Kogeshi" (Master of Traditional Craft) Sakai City, Japan. 210mm long and ultra-thin, perfectly tapered blades made from high-purity Hitachi White steel 2 (Shirogami #2) carbon steel. Handle made from natural Magnolia wood covered with Japanese traditional lacquer Urushi.
300 USD 270 USD
This Santoku was made by the Sakai Genkichi company from Sakai city in Osaka Prefecture in Japan.180mm long blade are hand-forged in the Japanese traditional smithing technique called "Warikomi" (Inserted hard steel between softer) using White steel 2 carbon steel as a core. Kasumi finish.
190 USD
This outstanding Deba knife was made by the Sakai Genkichi company from Sakai city in Osaka Prefecture in Japan. 180mm long single-edged blade are hand-forged in the Japanese traditional smithing technique called "Tsukehagane" (hammer welding) that welds low-carbon steel and high-carbon steel (Hitachi Metal Blue steel 2). Kasumi finish.
364 USD
This outstanding Deba knife was made by the Sakai Genkichi company from Sakai city in Osaka Prefecture in Japan. 165mm long single-edged blade are hand-forged in the Japanese traditional smithing technique called "Tsukehagane" (hammer welding) that welds low-carbon steel and high-carbon steel (Hitachi Metal Blue steel 2). Kasumi finish.
316 USD
Items 1 to 16 of 79 total

Carbon steel, from the title, contains a large amount of carbon (high-carbon steel) in its composition (from 0.6% to 2.0%). It is carbon that gives the blade excellent strength and wears resistance, allowing it to maintain the sharpness of the blade edge for a long time, even with active use. Going a little deeper into history, you can see that until the beginning of the 20th century, all over the world, only high carbon steel was used for the production of kitchen knives. In 1914 the George Ibberson & Co., from Sheffield, England, started making a knife from stainless steel. But their knives soon earned the reputation of "Knife that not cut." Of course, modern stainless steel doesn't have such a problem. But why do Japanese professional chefs and Japanese steelmakers (Hitachi Metals, etc.) still prefer carbon steel despite its tendency to rust? The main reason is the possibility of carbon steel sharpening to an extremely high level of sharpness and long-term retention of the cutting edge at its relatively low price. Stainless steel with the same cutting spec will be more expensive. 
 In Japan, Sharpness, or rather, the ability of a knife to make a perfect cut, is especially important. One of the essential Japanese Cuisine) Principles (和食, Washoku) is "Eating" with eyes. It means that Japanese food should be fascinated with freshness, looks, colors, shapes, textures, and design. So, every slice cut should be done perfectly, without smashing the product. Fresh looks (HIKARI-shining) of Sashimi or Sushi (sliced raw fish) directly depend on the knife's sharpness.
Conclusion: 
If you often use a knife, and quality cuts and clean slicing are important, carbon steel is the best choice for a relatively low budget. Rusting, we mean an aggressive form with an orange flaky carbon steel surface, is easily avoided by wiping the knife to remove moisture. But you should be prepared that the knife blade will receive a charcoal gray patina anyway in the process of work. But this is not rust. It is a patina, kind of a mild form of oxidation, affects only the outer surface of the blade, and prevents further corrosion. And this patina has an excellent look. If you are not a big fan of patina, you can check blades with a SAN MAI or so-called sandwich construction (stainless clad carbon).

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